Known or suspected to be contaminated

Known or suspected to be contaminated

Infectious waste needs to be treated to reduce / eliminate the risks present. Because of this, it costs more to treat and dispose of infectious waste than other healthcare wastes so it is important to practice good waste segregation.

Infectious waste contaminated by medicinal products

The yellow waste stream is used for waste that has been produced from the treatment of infectious patients or those suspected of having an infection, but that is also medicinally contaminated.

Yellow-stream waste must be sent for incineration at a suitably authorised facility. Yellow-lidded sharps units are for sharps that have been used in the administration of, or are contaminated by, medicines other than those that are cytotoxic and cytostatic. Yellow bags and yellow-lidded containers are for non-sharps items that have been used in the treatment of infectious clients, or those suspected of having an infection, that may also be contaminated with medicines or chemicals.

Infectious waste not contaminated with medicinal products

The orange waste stream is used for waste that has been produced from the treatment of infectious patients or those suspected of having an infection, but that is not medicinally or chemically contaminated.

Orange-stream waste can be sent for disinfection by alternative treatment at a suitably authorised facility. Orange-lidded sharps units are for sharps that have not been used in the administration of medicines. Orange bags and orange-lidded containers are for non-sharps waste that has been produced from the treatment of infectious patients, or those suspected of having an infection.

Infectious anatomical waste

The red waste stream is used for infectious and non-infectious anatomical waste.

Red-stream waste must be sent for incineration at a suitably authorised facility. Red-lidded containers are used for anatomical waste; it is not a requirement to segregate infectious from non-infectious anatomical wastes as the treatment and disposal method is the same.

Infectious gypsum waste

Gypsum has a high sulphate content. Combining high sulphate content waste with biodegradable waste produces highly toxic and odorous hydrogen sulphide gas. Because of this, gypsum is banned from normal landfill.

Infectious gypsum waste must be incinerated, whereas non-infectious waste can be consigned for recovery.

Experienced and reputable

Our experienced teams provide advice and guidance for appropriate handling, containment, transportation and disposal of infectious waste.

FAQ's - Infectious Waste Disposal

What is infectious waste?

Infectious waste is waste that is hazardous to any person or animal that comes into contact with it.

How to dispose of infectious waste

Different types of infectious waste require different methods of disposal. You can find out more about which are the relevant containers for the type of infectious waste here 

What bins/bags should you use for infectious waste?

Infectious waste can be disposed of in different types of bags and containers. You can find out more information here.

What is the difference between infectious and non-infectious waste?

Infectious waste is potentially hazardous to those who come in contact with it and needs either treatment to render safe prior to disposal or incineration.

Non-infectious waste is not hazardous to those who come in contact with it and is suitable for direct disposal or recycling.

What colour bag do I need for infectious waste?

Different bags can be used for dufferent types of infectious waste. You can find out which bags are suitable for the relevant type of waste here.

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If you are an EXISITING CUSTOMER please call 0333 240 4400 or email supportuk@stericycle.com to speak to one of our customer advisors.